2020: A pivotal year for Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture

The Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture (KJWA) brings countries together to tackle climate change through agriculture. By putting agriculture in the spotlight at international climate negotiations, the KJWA has enormous potential to make agriculture a meaningful part of the climate change solution.

With nearly all FAO member countries represented and over half of the workshops now completed, 2020 is an important turning point for Koronivia. In November, the two Subsidiary Bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) will report back to the 26th Climate Change Conference (Glasgow, Scotland) on the outcomes of the KJWA, with countries due to reach a conclusion on the future of Koronivia post-2020.  There are two more workshops planned this year as well as  final discussions to be held at the 26th Climate Change Conference (COP26) (see KJWA road map).

FAO will also be hosting its Fourth Koronivia Dialogue, from 20-22 April in Rome, where agricultural experts from FAO member countries can meet in an informal setting to exchange views on ways to implement the KJWA.

Boosting Koronivia

FAO has been taking a leading role in advocating for food security and sustainable agriculture in the face of climate change for years. The Organization is committed to supporting member countries in all the main areas of the KJWA including soil, livestock, nutrient and water management, and the food security and socio-economic impacts of climate change.

Through a project supported by the Government of Germany, FAO has produced a number of knowledge products in English, French and Spanish including analyses of submissions for agricultural experts under the UNFCCC KJWA process, publications, animations and video interviews aimed at the broader Koronivia community.  Thanks to this project, FAO also facilitated the participation of over 25 countries and six farmers in the workshop on nutrient use and manure management at the 25th Climate Change Conference (COP25). Two other side events at COP25 focused on putting the Koronivia Joint Work on Agriculture into practice.

Regional initiatives

FAO is directly involved in strengthening and facilitating country-to-country exchanges within growing regional groups. The project is supporting countries and stakeholders in their effort to be more organized and effective in the Koronivia negotiation process. These include the League of Arab States (LAS), Francophone countries in Africa, Pacific Small Island Developing States (SIDS), the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) groups. The Latin American and Caribbean Platform for Climate Action in Agriculture (PLACA) was officially launched at COP25 and now includes over ten countries with more in talks to join. This initiative is a network for exchange of knowledge and experiences around climate action in the agricultural sector, and it is open to all countries in the region on a voluntary basis.

FAO will be supporting a number of regional dialogues in the run-up to COP26 including a meeting of the ASEAN groups in February (Bangkok) and a meeting of the League of Arab States (Cairo) in April, as well as an African Group of Negotiators Expert Support (AGNES) training session on governance and negotiations planned in Nairobi (February-March 2020).

Furthermore, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan (MAFF) has also funded another project in support of Koronivia. The KJWA-Plus project will further boost and facilitate knowledge exchange and country access to knowledge products and lessons learned with a particular focus on Asia. Through this project, FAO will support a meeting of in collaboration with the CGIAR research program on climate change, agriculture and food security (CCAFS) planned to take place in Asia in May 2020. The KJWA-Plus project runs until May 2022.